4. MĂ€rz 2015

What I have learned from mircoXchg 2015

York Xylander

We attended the microxchg 2015 from 12.2.-13.2. with a crew of 7 people and did not regret it. 🙂
Location was the Kalkscheune in Berlin, a lofty-style industrial building. Nice atmosphere, great catering.

What did I learn?
  • Microservices are written in English without hyphen. Thanks Sam! 
  • It is interesting to focus on one specific/narrow topic and listen to talks with different perspectives/aspects 
    • But a total of 26 sessions in two tracks did result in some repetitions. 
    • Friday evening nobody wanted to hear ‚docker', ‚conway', ‚microservice‘ anymore.  (Unfortunately our talk was the last one
)
  • There is no concise/sharp definition of what microservices are. (‚I know it is a microservice architecture when I see it‘)
    • But most people agreed on these properties: 
      • „Can be deployed independently“
      • „Loosly coupled service oriented architecture with bounded context“
      • „Self-contained and independent runtime process“
    • Unclear are the following questions:
      • How large is micro?
      • Does the UI belong to microservices? If not, where should the UI be consolidated? 
      • How do you handle service to service communication: sync/async 
  • Microservice architectures are not trivial.
    • They result in „Complex, distributed, interconnected systems“ (Uwe Friedrichsen) and show emergent behavior. 
    • Technically there are a bunch of challenges you have to tackle:
      • developing, running, deploying, testing, debugging, tracing, discovering, observing

    • For each of these challenges promising solutions are popping up, but if you have to cope with all challenges at the same time, this might get overwhelming. 
  • Clearly microservices are now deep in the technology adoption cycle and are rapidly gaining speed.
    • In some sense it has become the focal point of the agile, lean, devops, domain driven design, container, cloud, continuous delivery movement - supporting each other in a positive feedback setup.
    • If you get it right, then this leads to adaptive (product) organizations that can react extremely fast to (market) changes.
      • If you do not need this: Then maybe you should not go micro.
    • First figures/analysis on the performance of microservice based organizations are available (Adrian Cockcraft): '10 times faster reaction times at 70% cost.'
  • And of course as usual: There are no silver bullets.   
What can I recommend?
  • Uwe Friedrichsen gave a great introductory talk 
  • Same is true for Sam Newman 
  • Fred George presented the challenges you have to face with microservices architectures
    • His asynchronous services example pushed ‚loosely coupled‘ to the extremes. Had a nice chat with him afterwards, what this means for product organizations and product managers: 'Command and control‘ is so dead 🙂  
  • On the more technical side I definitely enjoyed Jörg PfrĂŒnders talk about testing of microservices
    • Great introduction of what it means for your continuous delivery pipeline if you go micro.
    • The slides are in German but the drawings are quite self-explanatory.
  • For me the highlight of the conference was Adrian Cockcraft’s State of the Art in Microservices talk
    • "Cost and size and risk of change reduced“ AND "Rate of change increased"
    • With his insights into the Valley’s industry he showed the big picture and why these are so exciting times to live in. 
And finally: 

At leanovate we have built a simple shop application („Microzon“) based on a bunch of microservices (product, cart, billing, 
.).

In this lab environment we experiment with different implementation variants, frameworks, infrastructure components to cope with the above mentioned challenges: Microzon on Github

Our talk presents some of our learnings.

York Xylander
Lean | Technology | Organization

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Leanovate GmbH, Besitzer: (Firmensitz: Deutschland), wĂŒrde gerne mit externen Diensten personenbezogene Daten verarbeiten. Dies ist fĂŒr die Nutzung der Website nicht notwendig, ermöglicht aber eine noch engere Interaktion mit Ihnen. Falls gewĂŒnscht, treffen Sie bitte eine Auswahl: